Monday, March 10, 2008

Podcast Appalachia: "Where is Appalachia?"

The first real episode of Podcast Appalachia is now available for download. You can find it on iTunes or download it directly here. In this episode, I attempt to define the geographic boundaries of Appalachia and examine how these boundaries have changed over the years. Please, take a listen and let me know what you think! You can also find a transcript (and the rss feed for subscribing via iPods and mp3 players) here.

6 comments:

Curtis said...

Nice podcast. However, I would state that those of us from the Ohio River Valley have always considered ourselves as part of Appalachia as evidenced by our cultural similarities, geographical connection, and speech syntax. Perhaps because we live not in the core area but on the outer edge we're like the red headed step children?

Curtis said...

. . . and, yes, to fit neatly into the stereotype, both my daddy and granddad played the banjo! ;-)

I definitely look forward to hearing more.

Eric Drummond Smith said...

Curtis, that is a good point - the longer time goes on, the more I think that eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and parts of Alabama, Georgia, and maybe South Carolina are at least part of the hinterland of "Appalachia" per say. . . we're planning on expanding our boundaries here, but you know - - - time and time. . . . look for those additions though - I promise they're coming.

Tipper said...

I love it. I can't hear the cast-no high speed in my area of Appalachia-but loved reading it. Thanks for making it available both ways. I look forward to the next one.

John Norris Brown said...

No problem. I'm glad y'all like it. As for the definition, Appalachia is far more than geographical boundaries, so there are many Appalachians outside the region altogether. So please don't feel slighted :-)

Our Goblin Market said...

http://www.umich.edu/~econdev/arc/index.html